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Skyline Automotive LLC - Best Midsize Sedans

Please Read Skyline Automotive LLC - Best Midsize Sedans

Content provided by MotorTrend

MotorTrend tests more than 200 vehicles at the track every year. We rate cars using the same factors you do, including how they drive, interior space, efficiency, tech, value, and safety. Ratings are only applicable within each respective segment.

  1. 2022 Honda Accord - 9.1/10 - After a midcycle refresh for 2021, we're not expecting any major changes to the Accord for 2022. Barring any significant revisions, it will carry forward with two gas engines and a hybrid option. The Accord competes with other affordable four-doors including the Hyundai Sonata, Toyota Camry, Kia K5, and Subaru Legacy.

  2. 2022 Subaru Legacy - 8.6/10 - Subaru knows its buyers and delivers on their priorities with the Legacy. The midsize sedan offers a compelling blend of technology, safety, and performance in a roomy and comfortable vessel. Middling style and a vexing CVT are the Legacy's greatest Achilles heels.

  3. 2022 Hyundai Sonata - 8.5/10 - Hyundai has been selling the Sonata here in the U.S. for more than 30 years, and the current eighth generation is the best version yet. Redesigned for the 2020 model year, the Hyundai Sonata is among the better midsize sedans on the market. It's mechanically related to the Kia K5.

  4. 2022 Kia K5 - 8.3/10 - The midsize sedan once known as the Kia Optima has transformed into the K5. Introduced for 2021, the K5 stands out in the segment with evocative exterior styling. Yet despite those looks it remains a relatively normal car in terms of features and capabilities. The K5 is offered with a choice of turbocharged engines and available AWD. Like the Optima before it, the K5 targets sedan stalwarts like the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry, and mechanically related Hyundai Sonata. The K5 is built in West Point, Georgia, alongside the Kia Telluride.

  5. 2022 Toyota Camry - 8/10 - Although it's no longer Toyota's best-selling model (that title now goes to the RAV4), the venerable Camry remains a go-to choice for those seeking a dependable midsize sedan. The current-gen Camry was introduced for the 2018 model year and sees a mild face-lift for 2021. The Camry sits squarely in the center of Toyota's lineup of sedans between the compact Corolla and full-size Avalon. Besides its longtime rival, the Honda Accord, the Camry also competes with midsize four-doors including the Subaru Legacy, Nissan Altima, and Hyundai Sonata.

  6. 2021 Nissan Altima - 7.7/10 - Positioned above the compact Sentra and below the full-size Maxima, the Altima is the middle child of Nissan's sedan lineup. Nissan issued a full redesign of the Altima for the 2019 model year, and the family sedan has been relatively unchanged since. The Altima competes in the midsize sedan segment alongside cars such as the Honda Accord, Hyundai Sonata, Toyota Camry, and Subaru Legacy.

  7. 2022 Volkswagen Passat - 7.1/10 - Once one of Volkswagen's most successful cars in the United States, the Passat enters its final year of production with a Limited Edition trim. It rides on the platform that's been on sale in the United States since 2012, the same year it won our MotorTrend Car of the Year award. The Passat last received a major refresh in 2020. Although this midsize sedan no longer feels like a fresh offering, it comes with the traditional advantages of its segment, namely a comfortable ride, a large trunk, and spacious interior.

  8. 2021 Chevrolet Malibu - One of the longest-running nameplates in the Chevrolet lineup, the Malibu has been a mainstay in the midsize sedan segment for decades. Since its inception, the Malibu has evolved from a rear-drive car that's available in multiple flavors to a front-drive model offered only one body style. Chevrolet even offered a hybrid Malibu for a short time to lure eco-minded consumers to the brand. With only a short time left before it's discontinued, the Malibu lineup has been streamlined. A number of cosmetic packages are also offered.

  9. 2021 Mazda Mazda6 - As we wait for the rumored RWD, inline-six-powered, next-gen 6, Mazda adds some polish to its midsize sedan for 2021. The current-generation model debuted for the 2014 model year and saw a mid-cycle facelift for 2018, adding a turbocharged engine option. The 2021 Mazda 6 competes with other affordable midsize sedans including the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry, and Hyundai Sonata.

Original Source: https://www.motortrend.com/style/sedan/

How to get a car loan with bad credit

How to get a car loan with bad credit

Young woman sitting in new car with key in showroom

You may be able to get a car loan with bad credit, but you’ll want to carefully weigh the costs.

If you need a car loan but have less-than-perfect credit, your financing terms may be expensive. Lenders use credit scores to estimate the likelihood you’ll pay back your loan — the lower your scores, the more risk they believe they’re taking on. In exchange for that risk, lenders will usually charge a higher interest rate.

For example, someone with subprime credit (which Experian defines as scores of 501 to 600) received an average rate of 11.33% for a new vehicle and 17.78% for a used one in the second quarter of 2020, according to an Experian report. By comparison, the average interest rate on a 60-month new-car loan was 5.14% during that same period, according to the Federal Reserve.

We’ll look at some steps you can take to shop for an auto loan that may help lower the cost of financing a vehicle, as well as review our picks for auto lenders that offer car loans for bad credit.

How can I get financed for a car with bad credit?

These steps could help you improve your chances of getting approved for a car loan that fits your budget.

Check your credit

Before you begin shopping for a car loan, check your credit. Review your credit reports for any incorrect information and dispute those errors. Inaccuracies could lower your credit scores and hurt your ability to qualify for a loan.

Checking your credit can also help set your expectations before you start looking for a loan. You can check your Equifax and TransUnion credit reports for free on Credit Karma or request one free credit report from each credit bureau per year at annualcreditreport.com.

If you don’t need a new car right away, taking some time to build your credit could pay off — you may be able to qualify for a lower interest rate that could save you thousands on your auto loan. But if you can’t wait, you may want to consider asking a family member or close friend to be a co-signer. A co-signer with good credit could give you a better chance of getting approved for a loan or may help you get a better loan rate and terms.

Save for a down payment

Saving for a down payment can come with a several benefits. First, a down payment may help you qualify for an auto loan more easily, especially if you have low credit scores. Without a down payment, the lender takes on more risk since it may lose more money if you don’t repay the loan and it needs to repossess the car. In fact, some lenders may require you to put some money down.

Plus, you’ll pay less interest with a down payment. The more money you put down, the less you’ll need to borrow for the car. That means you’ll pay interest on a smaller balance, lowering your total interest paid.

You may also get a lower interest rate if you make a down payment. Lenders consider your loan-to-value ratio — your loan amount versus the value of the vehicle — when setting your interest rate.

Determine how much you can afford

Think beyond your monthly loan payment as you figure out how much you can afford to borrow. Consider the costs of car ownership — such as fuel, regular maintenance, auto insurance, and any parking expenses or property taxes — and factor them into your budget.

It may be tempting to stretch your loan term to six or seven years in exchange for a lower monthly payment. But keep in mind that a longer loan term means you could end up paying more in interest over the length of the loan — and you increase your risk of becoming upside down on your loan, which can create some challenges when it’s time to sell or trade in your car because you’ll owe more than it’s worth. Our auto loan calculator can help you estimate how much you’d pay in interest on a car loan.

Shop with different lenders

Shopping around and comparing rates and loan terms across lenders may help you find the best loan for your needs and your budget. If you have bad credit, here are some lenders you might consider.

  • Your current bank or credit union — If you already have a relationship with a bank or credit union, that can be a good place to start.

  • Online lenders — Some online lenders and lending platforms specialize in car loans for people with bad credit. They may also allow you to apply for prequalification directly on their websites. If you’re prequalified, you’ll be able to see the estimated loan rate and terms you may qualify for. Just keep in mind that prequalification isn’t a guarantee you’ll be approved for the loan or the estimated loan terms.

  • Car dealerships — Dealerships typically have relationships with a number of banks and finance companies, which means they may be able to find a lender in their network that will approve you for a loan. Some dealerships also have special financing departments that are dedicated to helping people with poor credit.

  • Buy-here, pay-here dealerships — If you can’t get approved for an auto loan anywhere else and you need a car, a buy-here, pay-here dealership could be an option — but consider it a last resort. These “no credit check” dealerships offer their own loans to people with bad credit — and their interest rates tend to be much higher than those offered by banks and other lenders.

To minimize the impact that shopping for an auto loan can have on your credit, it’s a good idea to shop for rates within the same time period. FICO scoring models count multiple credit inquiries of the same type within a 45-day period as a single inquiry. VantageScore counts multiple inquiries within a 14-day period as a single inquiry.

Can I get a car loan with a 500 credit score?

It’s possible to get a car loan with a credit score of 500, but it’ll cost you. People with credit scores of 500 or lower received an average rate of 13.97% for new-car loans and 20.67% for used-car loans in the second quarter of 2020, according to the Experian State of the Automotive Finance Market report.

That’s a big difference from the loan rates for people with credit scores of 661 to 780 (considered prime) — they received average rates of 4.21% for new-car loans and 6.05% for used-car loans.

Getting a car loan with a credit score of 500 could be tough, too. The Experian report shows that only 0.37% of new-car loans and 4.35% of used-car loans issued in the fourth quarter of 2019 went to people with credit scores of 500 or lower.

article link: https://www.creditkarma.com/auto/i/can-you-get-a-car-loan-with-bad-credit

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